Category Archives: Personalization

Amazon is reportedly exploring technology that could spell the end of privacy as we know it

 

In an effort to boost convenience, Amazon may be exploring a new way for customers to surrender privacy.

Smart lock company August and connected garage door firm Garageio — two startups with ties to Amazon — are looking into ways to allow delivery people to leave packages in your house or apartment when no one is home, reports tech blog The Information.

On one hand, the ability to deliver items, even when recipients aren’t home, is a golden opportunity for Amazon.

On the other hand, allowing a company to enter to deliver a package into one’s house essentially surrenders the idea of the expectation of privacy in your own home.

In-home drop off isn’t going to be an open door policy. Wareable reports that August is developing technology that would allow smart locks to open for delivery people during certain windows of time, by using temporary pins, or via smartphones.

Source: Amazon explores in-home delivery – Business Insider

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The Top Ten Media Trends Publishers Can’t Ignore

Following are 10 media trends publishers cannot ignore:

1. Content Consumption Goes Mobile

It’s well known that readers are increasingly accessing content via their mobile devices. “Almost two thirds of our visitors are coming from mobile devices to read our content,” said Litvack. “Where the eyeballs go, the dollars follow. Mobile spend is about to kick up to become the third largest ad category, behind desktop advertising and television ads.” And with better targeting technology and ad experiences, CPM rates for mobile ads will rise, predicted Litvack.

2. Media Consumption Is Happening Off Brand

63% of Americans find news on Facebook and Twitter, and social media has surpassed television as the most popular source of news. That means publishers’ audiences have migrated away from their sites and are more difficult to monetize than ever. Publishers need to find creative ways attract readers on a regular basis and monetize.

3. The Newsletter Is Becoming Publishers’ Most Important Product

Although fewer readers are coming to media sites for news, their engagement with email newsletters continues to rise. Litvack said that open rates and clickthrough rates are going up, making email one of the most important channels to cultivate an audience and drive revenue.

4. Programmatic Selling Is on the Rise & Will Completely Eclipse Direct

95% of advertisers are buying programmatically on MPA websites, and a large portion of those advertisers are buying programmatic only. To keep CPMs from trending down, publishers need to invest in ad targeting technology and provide positive ad experiences to readers, advised Litvack.

5. Media Companies Are Becoming Agencies

Publishers like Time Inc., Hearst, and Condé Nast have created studios separate from magazine editorial that are dedicated to creating native advertising. Advertisers increasingly want to work with publishers to develop creative campaigns, putting demands on publishers to develop new workflows to deliver native content, campaign reports, and high-quality service like an agency.

6. Video, Video, Video

Digital video already dominates the media space and will continue to do so over the next several years. Publishers need to develop workflows to quickly create and distribute video content. Video will help publishers engage readers on social media and on their mobile devices, where video consumption is flourishing, said Litvack.

7. Advertising Alone Won’t Support a Media Business

“If we want to see real growth for our industry, we can’t be ad supported alone,” said Litvack. He recommended publishers invest in events businesses, data businesses, and reinvent their revenue models to discover new opportunities.

8. Abundance of Content

Litvack said that it would take one person more than 5 million years to watch the amount of video that will cross global IP networks each month in 2019. There’s a lot of digital content out there, and a lot of high quality digital content, so publishers can’t produce good content alone. “You have to look at the data and dig deeper into that data to justify what is the right story to write for your audience,” said Litvack.

9. Personalization is Prime Time

Content personalization is now a reality and will become the dominant method of delivering content, said Litvack. 56% of websites and 67% of emails have some level of personalization. Publishers need to continue to integrate this technology into their platforms in order to meet consumers’ expectations.

10. There’s Gold in Your 1st Party Data

Behind many of these trends is the growing importance of first-party data that can drive publishers’ content, audience development, and monetization strategies. Litvack noted that first-party data is invaluable for ad targeting, content personalization, cross-platform identification, and audience extension. Without a unified database and robust analytics technology that can identify individual site visitors and track behavior, publishers cannot iterate and evolve for the future.

Source: The Top Ten Media Trends Publishers Can’t Ignore

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Filed under advertising, Big Data, Personalization, Publishing

Ad Limiting Going Mobile, Thanks To Apple

Ad blocking is bad enough, but we live in a world going mobile — as The Who once put it — at a very rapid pace. And, with Apple building a form of ad limitation into itslatest mobile operating system, watch out, ad tech.

In a piece in AdExchanger on Sept. 7, attorney Alan Chapell notes that significant changes to iOS10 are “likely tocause harm to legitimately recognized advertising models.” In an email interview, Chapell tells Programmatic Insider that Apple is making the changes in the name of user privacy.

“In iOS9, Apple passes a signal for users that enable [Limit Ad Tracking] that tells the marketplace not to conduct interest-based advertising for that user. As noted by the Futureof Privacy Forum: Apple specifically permitted companies to continue to use the ID for certain limited other uses when Limit Ad Tracking was enabled, ‘including frequency capping, attribution,conversion events, estimating the number of unique users, advertising fraud detection, and debugging’ (iOS Developer Library).

In iOS10, Apple will stop sending out the DoNot Track flag for users who enact LAT, Chapell writes. And, as noted by the Future of Privacy Forum: “Beginning in iOS 10, when a user enables “Limit Ad Tracking,” the OS will sendalong the advertising identifier with a new value of ‘00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000.’ This will more effectively ensure that users are no longer targeted or tracked by many adnetworks across sites or over time. But it will also prevent the previously permitted ‘frequency capping, attribution, conversion events, estimating the number of unique users, advertising frauddetection, and debugging’ uses of this ID.”

“Generally speaking,” Chapell adds, “advertisers are less willing and able to advertise to users insituations where the aforementioned tools are not available to those advertisers. In other words, Apple has changed the functionality of the Identifier for Advertising [IDFA] in iOS10 in ways thatbreaks advertising models which are generally recognized as legitimate.”

Source: Ad Lim

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Filed under advertising, Apple, iPhone, Mobile, Personalization, Privacy

Snapchat Pushes Further Into Digital Ad Targeting – WSJ

Snapchat is pushing further into sophisticated digital ad targeting, including letting advertisers target customers using email databases and other data sources.

The mobile app company is rolling out three new targeting options for marketers.

Through a product called Snap Audience Match, Snapchat is enabling marketers to take existing lists of email addresses and mobile device IDs, and anonymously match that data with Snapchat’s own pool of consumer data, allowing enhanced ad targeting. In this process, Snapchat is taking steps to make sure it does not employ any personally identifiable data when executing these ad campaigns.

The company has been quietly testing this offering over the past few months with brands like eBay. EBAY -1.79 % Consumers will have the option to opt out of the Audience Match product.

Another new initiative, Snapchat Lifestyle Categories, lets brands direct ads to people who consume certain types of videos (like sports or gaming content). Lastly, Snapchat is helping advertisers target ads to consumers who exhibit a certain set of characteristics that are similar to an advertiser’s existing customers– a product Snapchat is calling “Lookalikes.”

These tactics are rather standard fare for many digital media outlets, but their introduction amounts to a noteworthy evolution for Snapchat, which has been conservative about the targeting capabilities it offers. Snapchat founder Evan Spiegel was famously quoted as saying that he doesn’t want advertising on the app to be “creepy” for consumers.

Source: Snapchat Pushes Further Into Digital Ad Targeting – WSJ

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How The Dallas Morning News made a millennial-minded news app – Digiday

After revamping its navigation and design, the paper’s app more than doubled the share of readers between ages 18 and 34.

Source: How The Dallas Morning News made a millennial-minded news app – Digiday

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Filed under App Creation, Newspaper, Personalization

Magazine Readers Are Wealthy & Well Educated, USPS Study Finds

The quintessential subscribers to printed American consumer magazines are wealthy, well-educated empty nesters who live in a single-family house, a recent U.S. Postal Service study suggests.

“Households with incomes above $100,000 receive three times as many periodicals as households earning less than $35,000,” says the USPS’s recently released annual Household Diary Study of mail received by more than 5,000 households during 2015.

“For households whose heads are under 34 years old and with incomes less than $35,000, the average is only 0.2 pieces per week. Households with income above $100,000 and whose heads are over 55 receive the most periodicals, with 1.7 pieces per week.”

Households that receive the most mailed periodicals also tend to have more than one adult, no children (Come on, parents, magazines are a great way to get kids interested in reading.), be headed by someone with a postgraduate degree, and reside in a single-family house.

Related story: B2Me: Increasing Your Magazine’s Value with Customization

 

Read More Source: Magazine Readers Are Wealthy & Well Educated, USPS Study Finds

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Filed under Magazine, Personalization, Print, Publishing

Mass-customized Magazines are Now Possible Thanks to Production Inkjet Presses

Get ready for the rise of mass-customized “B2Me” magazines. Once a pipe dream, the concept of magazines that are tailored to each reader is now a reality.

Consider, for example, ZEB magazine of Belgium, which has a print run of 150,000 copies that are so customized and personalized that no two copies are alike. Several recent developments have made it feasible and potentially profitable for publishers to provide far more customization of their printed magazines than in the recent past. There’s real opportunity here, but also new challenges for traditional magazine publishers.

What’s making mass-customized magazines possible are new full-color inkjet presses that can print different versions of the same pages without the expensive press stops and plate changes required by traditional offset printing. Inkjet has come a long way from the days of “uglyjet,” when its usage in magazines was restricted mostly to producing postal addresses, clunky messages and cartoonish images. These days, it can be difficult to distinguish an inkjet-printed magazine page from an offset page.

Changes in the advertising market are creating a greater need and opportunity for customized magazines. Programmatic advertising in digital media has demonstrated the power of getting the right message to the right person at the right time, undermining the “spray and pray” approach often associated with advertising in traditional media.

ZEB magazine is an extreme, but nevertheless instructive, example of what is possible for magazines. ZEB, a multi-brand fashion publisher, uses customer data — such as purchase history, age, gender, favorite brands and place of residence — to customize the text and images on multiple pages of its customer “magazine,” which is arguably a catalog.

The customization and personalization were not a one-time experiment; ZEB continues to tailor each magazine copy because doing so generates enough additional sales and customer loyalty to create a positive ROI.

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Source: Mass-customized Magazines are Now Possible Thanks to Production Inkjet Presses

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Color Plus Personalization: Selling the Value of Inkjet

In today’s market, making a good first impression is everything. With information overload at every turn, people will now only glance at a website, mailpiece, or video before deciding whether it’s worth their time. Marketers are seeking strategies to create better pieces with strong visual appeal that prompt the consumer to read further or take action. For many marketers, this means turning to color and personalization.

An Infographic from Kissmetrics on how color can affect conversions highlighted the psychological impact of color on the human brain. Key statistics are as follows:

  • 93% of people say that the visual dimension is the #1 influencing sense that affects their purchasing decision (over taste, smell, etc.).
  • Studies suggest that people make a subconscious judgment about a product within 90 seconds of initially viewing it. Up to 90% of this assessment is based on color alone.
  • Magazine readers recognize full-color ads 26% more often than black & white ads.

It is no wonder that today’s marketers are focused on adding more and more color to communications. According to InfoTrends’ 2016 State of the Market Study on Customer Engagement Technologies, over 80% of enterprises stated that full-color printing for promotional and transactional communications is important.

Figure 1: How important do you think it is to switch printed communications from black & white to full color?

 

Read More: http://blog.infotrends.com/?p=21843

Source: InfoTrends InfoBlog » Color Plus Personalization: Selling the Value of Inkjet

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Filed under Color, InfoGraphic, Magazine, Personalization, Publishing

Google AMP is about to become a much bigger deal, showing up in everybody’s mobile search results » Nieman Journalism Lab

Still debating whether to make your #content AMP-compliant? Google is giving you by far your biggest nudge yet, and this one goes well beyond publishers.

Google’s effort to speed up the mobile web (and defend against the Facebook Instant Article-ization of everything) has become a steady drip of new features and announcements over the past few months, but the gradual rollout — and the project’s looming potential — has left some publishers wanting. (Slate and The Atlantic, for instance, both of whom create AMP pages for the majority of their stories, found that AMP pages accounted for “four percent of their site visits or less,” Digiday reported earlier this summer.)

A boost is coming, however: Google is now planning to show AMP links everywhere in its mobile search results — that is to say, in a place that probably drives a lot of traffic to your site. Wherever there’s an AMP page, Google will display it in the result (with an accompanying AMP lightning bolt). The boost does not come with any changes to the search rankings, and there are no plans to add a specific AMP signal into the Google search algorithm, Richard Gingras, Google’s head of news and social products, said. (Though page speed, which AMP targets, is already a small signal.) Users can test out how AMP pages will be displayed in an “early preview” — type in some search terms to try it out here on a mobile device. Google is looking for feedback from developers and publishers, and publishers who haven’t formatted their pages for AMP can get a sense of what they’ll be missing out on.

Source: Google AMP is about to become a much bigger deal, showing up in everybody’s mobile search results » Nieman Journalism Lab

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Personalization Ranks Highest On Smartphones

An article ran in Monday’s SearchBlog that presented data from Econsultancy, in partnership with Adobe Marketing Cloud, which shows hownearly half of brands and agencies still do not have a mobile strategy. In the comments section, Ed Papazian, president of Media Dynamics, wrote (I’m paraphrasing) that just because a media platformhas a lot of users doesn’t mean most, or all, advertisers should use it.

While Papazian makes a valid point, consider this. Laptop and desktop users — with a Digital Satisfaction Index(DSI) score of about 55 and 56, respectively — are least satisfied with personalization, which for me is one of the main reasons I connect with brands and retailers online and in stores. As aconsumer, I have many options. And according to the recent report from Intent Lab, I’m not the only consumer thinking this way.

The stat comes from Performics and NorthwesternUniversity, which recently created the search-based Intent Lab, along with a quarterly report that measures consumer attitudes and perceptions of online marketing.

Users of laptops and desktops are least satisfied with personalization, in my opinion, because advancements in technology now allow advertisers to talk with consumers nearly one-to-one throughtheir mobile device, which they keep with them nearly every waking moment of the day. Technology on the horizon will make that exchange between brands and consumers one-to-one. Some consumers may notwant that one-to-one connection. Advertisers will need to use extra caution and draw the line. Consumers might find it creepy.

Source: Personalization Ranks Highest On Smartphones 08/02/2016

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