Category Archives: iPad

Apple iPad Pro 9.7 specs vs. Google Pixel C, Microsoft Surface Pro 4 and Samsung Galaxy TabPro S – CNET

Apple’s latest 9.7-inch iPad Pro has all the power and performance of the original extra-large iPad Pro, in a smaller size. Inside, there’s a powerful processor, up to 256GB of storage and a new “True Tone” display that adjusts its color based on the light around you.

Source: Apple iPad Pro 9.7 specs vs. Google Pixel C, Microsoft Surface Pro 4 and Samsung Galaxy TabPro S – CNET

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Apple’s smaller iPad Pro will reportedly start at $599 | The Verge

Apple is just days away from unveiling a new iPhone and 9.7-inch iPad Pro, and today 9to5Mac is reporting that you can expect to pay at least $599 for the latter. The smaller iPad Pro will start at a higher price than any 9.7-inch that’s come before it, but at least for that money you’ll be getting a bump in storage.

Source: Apple’s smaller iPad Pro will reportedly start at $599 | The Verge

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How We Consume Information

global_20news_consumption_q315

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January 18, 2016 · 8:49 am

OpenEFT … Option To Adobe’s DPS .Folio

An Open Plea for OpenEFT

by Peter Meirs

OpenEFT_logoOpenEFT is a new open source standard for packaging and exchanging digital content that will be officially released by IDEAlliance at the end of September. The format can be used by content creators, advertisers and digital newsstands to publish digital magazines on tablets. OpenEFT is free to use and carries no restrictions on how it is customized or distributed. The OpenEFT format was created by the industry to give publishers an alternative to proprietary formats that are commercially licensed and locked down.

In the early days of digital publishing, almost every technology solution was an interdependent mix of code and proprietary hardware. Technology providers offered workflow solutions to publishers that could save OpenEFT_logothem time and increase their productivity. The cost of these systems would often exceed $1 million, but publishers made the investment in hopes of reducing significant labor costs.

This was the model for selling publishing systems in the 1990s, when technology companies made huge profits on single vendor solutions. In his book, “The Innovators Dilemma,” Clayton Christensen described the risks that successful companies carry when they focus on optimizing their specialized products, rather than anticipating changes in market demand. Those changes happened quickly, and they profoundly disrupted the publishing technology model.

Scitex, a provider of advanced graphic design systems in the 1980s and ’90s, sold expensive, proprietary workstations and had annual sales approaching $700 million at its peak. When Adobe and Quark created similar applications that ran on inexpensive hardware, the market shifted, and Scitex’s sales dropped by 85 percent. The captive supply model didn’t work in a world where buyers could choose less expensive alternatives.

While it wasn’t exactly a move to standardization, platforms like Apple’s Power Mac and Workgroup servers provided an open environment for running interoperable applications. This led to the creation of best-of-breed publishing workflows that usually included software from multiple vendors. Interoperability drove a competitive marketplace and solutions truly became cheaper, faster and better.

When Apple introduced the iPad in 2010, the focus on print workflows tilted heavily toward digital. Publishers scrambled to adapt their processes so they could also produce tablet versions. Woodwing, a company that provided print workflow systems, created a method for packaging content for its tablet apps. A year later, Woodwing opened its well implemented OFIP format to the public, free of charge. It was a noble attempt to standardize interactive publications across the industry.

In the short term, many providers and publishers benefitted from the new “OFIP standard.” This license-free format allowed third-party software companies to build their own tablet solutions, providing more choice to buyers. While the demand for magazines on tablets was still in question, at least the process to produce them was moving forward.

This is where the story turns. Opening OFIP to the public was not the same thing as making it an open source format. Woodwing offered its specification on a license-free basis, but it was not a true open source format under the control of a vendor-independent standards organization. As quickly as it was given, OFIP could be taken away. And that’s exactly what happened.

In October 2011, Adobe and Woodwing announced an alliance that involved, among other things, a “retirement” of the OFIP format. This meant all the niche players who had built solutions around OFIP were no longer able to create products using that format. Instead of using OFIP, Adobe’s DPS solution used a new format called .Folio. Adobe’s terms of service clearly restricts the use of the .Folio format to drive third-party viewers.

The sudden lack of an open standard for packaging and exchanging content prompted some industry players to approach IDEAlliance, a not-for-profit membership organization that supports the media supply chain. This resulted in an IDEAlliance-led effort to create a new, open format called OpenEFT.

The mission of OpenEFT is to serve as a universal format that will allow users to:

  • Export interactive digital magazine issues, using existing workflow tools, into a standardized format for exchange and rendition.
  • Deliver a standard, non-proprietary content package that digital newsstands can easily transform or customize.
  • Publish reader applications to a broad spectrum of platforms, with a single set of reader-independent XML based instructions.
  • Receive production-ready interactive ads from brands or agencies, packaged with all required media files, enhancements and business data.
  • Gather user metrics for both editorial and advertising for any analytics reporting model.

The value proposition for OpenEFT is far-reaching. Its adoption by publishers, technology providers, advertisers and digital newsstands would enable a frictionless supply chain that can allow unrestricted development and optimization of tablet applications. This would ultimately lead to a better consumer reading experience. Many companies that lost business when their OFIP-based products became unsupportable can again compete in an open marketplace.

Despite what some may think, OpenEFT was not created to compete with Adobe or with any other established industry player. IDEAlliance’s key objective is to re-establish a standardized format that was lost to industry with the deprecation of OFIP.

Publishing companies are desperately hoping that their subscribers will support paid digital editions. Unfortunately, the present model for producing digital renditions has not generated much consumer interest or publisher revenue. Demand will only happen when the perceived value of digital products matches that of print.

An industry standard technology like OpenEFT will enable a competitive marketplace that can innovate and disrupt the present model, much like Adobe and Quark did 15 years ago. Best of all, unlike OFIP, OpenEFT is a truly open format, maintained by a vendor-independent industry association. Industry players can confidently use the format to create, modify and exchange content without fear of losing access to the technology.

OpenEFT offers a great opportunity to increase both innovation and interoperability across the digital magazine supply chain. The question is whether publishers, advertisers, distributors and solution providers will agree to implement the format. The bigger question is, “Why wouldn’t they?”

Source: http://www.mediashepherd.com/2013/09/an-open-plea-for-openeft/

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How the tablet market evolved in 2012: Apple, Google, Samsung, Amazon, and Microsoft go to war

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The biggest year for tablets so far was undoubtedly 2012. Amazon and Google stepped up their games, Apple responded accordingly, Samsung flexed its muscles, and even Microsoft showed …

The biggest year for tablets so far was undoubtedly 2012. Amazon and Google stepped up their games, Apple responded accordingly, Samsung flexed its muscles, and even Microsoft showed up to the party. Here’s our take on what happened this year and what it all means.

Before we dive in though, it’s important to acknowledge that there are of course other companies that make and market tablets. The tablet space is still growing very rapidly, but it’s already massive enough for these firms to be able to sell their offerings. Without help from the big guys, however, it is becoming increasingly harder for them to compete. Each of the five has put in a huge amount of resources to ensure they get their cut.

As such, tablet buyers will almost definitely end up supporting the Apple iOS ecosystem, some form of the Android ecosystem (Google’s, Samsung’s, or Amazon’s variations), or Microsoft’s Windows 8 ecosystem. In fact, 2012 showed us that many people will end up with more than just one tablet for themselves, and thus likely multiple in their household.

Without further ado, let’s take a look at the bigger picture of what each company did, and tried to do, this year.

See on thenextweb.com

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Adobe Digital Publishing Suite Latest Release: New Device Support and Robust Analytics « Adobe Digital Publishing

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Delivering immersive experiences for books, magazines, newspapers, and corporate publications…

 

Digital Publishing Suite, Release 24, is now live. We are excited to announce support for new devices, analytics on end user behavior, and improvements to the publishing workflow and reading experience. For more detail on any of the features, visit the Adobe Digital Publishing Suite Help Site, hosted by Bob Bringhurst.

REACH MORE READERS: EXPANDED DEVICE SUPPORT Support for iPad Mini DPS apps built for iPad2 will automatically work for iPad Mini. With no extra effort, your app will be available for iPad Mini users as well. This benefits our Single Edition customers, as well as Pro and Enterprise.

Support for Kindle Fire HD 8.9” Device The Kindle Fire HD 8.9” device is planned to ship on November 20th, and your publication can be immediately available for early adopters. In order to target the device, designers can develop a 1920×1200 folio.

Web Viewer on Windows 8 If you use social sharing, articles shared by your readers can be viewed on Internet Explorer 10 on Windows 8 web browsers.

 

See on blogs.adobe.com

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U.S. Kids Continue to Look Forward to “iHoliday” | Nielsen Wire

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When it comes to devices, kids’ holiday wish lists are simple this year. The most-wanted gifts are predominantly from one company—Apple.  According to a recent Nielsen study, Apple’s popularity leading up to the holiday season continues a trend seen over the last couple of years, with American kids aged 6-12 generally more interested in the latest iOS offerings than other consumer electronics and gaming devices.

See on blog.nielsen.com

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Apple Now Owns the Page Turn

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Apple was granted a design patent this week for the page turn in an e-reader application. Does thian they now own the digital page turning effect?

See on bits.blogs.nytimes.com

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Adobe New DPS Digital Publishing Suite

Digital Publishing Suite Release 23

The latest release of Digital Publishing Suite contains features that will enhance the reader’s audio and video experience, as well as allow them to provide feedback while they are in the app. For production staff, the Folio Builder tools have been redesigned to enable more efficiency for designers. Last, as you have likely heard, we announced the launch of Single Edition in Creative Cloud, allowing Creative Cloud members to publish an unlimited number of single-issue apps for free.

Name Change: “Viewer Builder” is now “DPS App Builder”
With a growing list of customers using Digital Publishing Suite, we decided to change the name of “Viewer Builder” to “DPS App Builder.” We selected the name based on interviews with customers, and learned it is more intuitive for first-time users of Digital Publishing Suite.

Paywall for free folios in web viewer

When an article has been shared via social media, the recipient can view the article in the DPS web viewer. Up until this point, publishers could create a paywall for paid folios, asking readers to purchase the publication after reading a specified number of articles in the web view. Now, publishers can set up a paywall for free folios – such as catalogs or brochures — before providing access to the full publication. You can customize the text and the destination on the paywall to build up your existing customer database.

Full post: Adobe Digital Publishing Suite

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Adobe Announces New DPS – Digital Publishing Suite Version

NEW YORK — May 15, 2012 — At Adobe’s annual Digital Publishing Summit, Adobe Systems Incorporated (Nasdaq:ADBE) today announced a series of groundbreaking new features for Adobe® Digital Publishing Suite (DPS) that will allow media companies and corporate publishers to deliver unparalleled reach and monetize their unique content in new ways. Among the new features are Content Viewer for iPhone, social sharing, expanded font licensing and enhanced integration with Adobe Creative Suite® 6, a milestone release, creating an unbeatable combination for media and corporate organizations. Adobe is live blogging from the Summit at blogs.adobe.com/dpsnyc2012.
Adobe also announced Meredith Corporation has chosen Digital Publishing Suite to produce and distribute its leading brands, including Better Homes and Gardens, Parents and Fitness, to multiple channels. Digital Publishing Suite is the industry-leading cross-platform solution with 850 customers worldwide who have published more than 1,700 active applications and delivered more than 25 million digital issues to iPad, Kindle Fire and Android™ tablets since April 2011. Adobe is currently distributing 120,000 publications every day to tablet readers and continually evolves Digital Publishing Suite to keep pace with rapidly changing industry needs.

The new advancements include:
• Content Viewer for iPhone – The new Content Viewer for iPhone allows media and corporate organizations to target digital publication delivery across iPhone and iPod Touch devices in addition to the iPad, Kindle Fire and Android tablets, instantly expanding reach and access of content to over 220 million iPhone and iPod Touch owners globally. At the Digital Publishing Summit, The New Yorker, a Condé Nast publication, will be the first to show what the magazine might look like in the new Content Viewer.
• Social Sharing – New social sharing capabilities encourage readers and customers to share articles on Facebook, Twitter and via email directly from within their Digital Publishing Suite applications, enabling broad content proliferation, article sampling, and content metering that will help build publication brands and turn readers into paying subscribers. DPS customers can use this functionality to configure the articles available for sharing, the social media channels in which they can be shared, and the selection and quantity of articles viewed before a purchase decision is required. In conjunction with Adobe’s release of this feature, Wenner Media announced the launch of Us Weekly for iPad using Digital Publishing Suite. The application will be available for download on May 17 in Apple Newsstand. Wenner Media will preview social sharing in Us Weekly for iPad at the Adobe Digital Publishing Summit and expects to launch Us Weekly fully enabled for social sharing soon—the first digital magazine to provide these social sharing capabilities to readers.
• Extended Font Embedding Rights – Digital Publishing Suite customers can now enjoy extended rights from a select portion of the Adobe Type Library. Digital Publishing Suite customers who license Adobe Type Library fonts directly from Adobe, and who create content published in .folio files (which can include bitmaps, PDF and HTML) can embed these selected fonts inside their publications, with no additional font license or cost. With this set of high quality and award-winning Adobe fonts, Digital Publishing Suite customers will have a broad and fully-licensed typographic palette of over 800 fonts for any creative direction. On retina devices like the new iPad, access to these fonts enables designers to ensure typography remains crisp, clear, and consistent with the creative direction of the publication, while respecting intellectual property provisions.
• Alternate Layouts in Adobe InDesign® CS6 – Design and production teams can save time and accelerate workflows by
using Alternate Layout functionality in InDesign CS6 software to repurpose a single, primary InDesign layout for
publication to different size devices such as the iPhone, iPad, Kindle Fire and other mobile and tablet devices. Using
liquid page rules in the InDesign CS6 layout, designers can use visual page guidelines to indicate how InDesign should
intelligently arrange and resize content without requiring manual resize of each layout. Alternate Layout will transform
publishing workflows by allowing content creators to significantly reduce the amount of time required to publish content
to devices with different screen resolutions and aspect ratios, giving publishers and corporations the ability to efficiently
and rapidly generate publications across multiple devices.
• Digital Publishing Suite Now Integrates with Adobe Edge – Adobe Edge preview software enables designers to create
animated HTML5 content with Web standards, which can be easily placed in Digital Publishing Suite applications using
InDesign. Combined with the interactive overlays in Digital Publishing Suite, designers can take advantage of the intuitive
timeline and coding capabilities in Adobe Edge to create custom interactivity that increases engagement with editorial
and advertising content. As part of the recently launched Adobe Creative Cloud™, Adobe Edge preview includes a new
“publish to DPS” feature for InDesign CS6. The commercial release of Adobe Edge is expected later this year. Fast
Company is the first to use Edge animation in their magazine.

Original Post: http://www.adobe.com/aboutadobe/pressroom/pressreleases/201205/051512AdobeDPSummit.html

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