Category Archives: Google

Google Introduces AMP Lite For Slow Networks, Low-Ram Devices

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Google has introduced a new version of Accelerated Mobile Pages it calls AMP Lite. The new Web page format will take up to 45% fewer bytes than the standard AMP page to support slowernetwork connections.

AMP Lite, which compresses images and image data, will roll out globally for “bandwidth-constrained users” in countries such as Vietnam and Malaysia and for those with lowram devices. The changes may modify fine details of some images, but do not affect other parts of the page including ads, according to Software Engineers Huibao Lin and Eyal Peled.

The changewill optimize external fonts by using the amp-font tag, setting the font loading timeout to 0 seconds so thatpages display immediately regardless of whether the external font was previously cached or not, Google’s engineers wrote in a post.

Google also made improvement to image optimizations by AMP Cache. Changes made for AMP tooptimize image delivery range from removing invisible or difficult to view data, reducing color and quality of images without affecting visuals, and converting images to WebP format, which leadsto a 25% reduction in bytes and no loss in quality. A few other more techie changes are described by Lin and Peled.

Source: Google Introduces AMP Lite For Slow Networks, Low-Ram Devices 01/13/2017

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Google – AMP

AMP is a way to build web pages for static content that render fast. AMP in action consists of three different parts:

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Apple News is sending publishers traffic, but not revenue

A number of publishers say Apple News is sending them a significant traffic boost in the past month, but it’s doing little to help them monetize it.

Publishers say traffic has boomed since the mobile news aggregation app was refreshed as part of an iOS 10 update in mid-September. As part of that update, the app was designed to be bolder and include breaking news notifications and better organization of the main “For You” section.

Several news publisher clients reported they’re getting more audience from Apple News than from Google AMP, the search giant’s fast-loading mobile article initiative, according to Polar, a native ad platform, which is testing branded content promotion in Apple News with a small number of publishers.

Source: Apple News is sending publishers traffic, but not revenue

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Publishers are pleasantly surprised by Google AMP traffic – Digiday

If some publishers are cooling on Facebook Instant Articles, they’re becoming hot and heavy with Google AMP, the search engine’s answer to Instant Articles.

In February, Google rolled out AMP, which stands for Accelerated Mobile Pages, on mobile search results in Google News. Publishers scrambled to adopt Google’s open-source code on their pages because search still drives close to 40 percent of referral traffic overall, and they know that as their audiences shift to mobile, having fast mobile pages can only help them get surfaced by Google’s algorithm.

“We love it,” said Ben Robinson, Thrillist’s editorial director. Thrillist is getting 15 percent of its search traffic from AMP, boosting its search traffic by more than a third, which he called “exciting,” given the company is more lifestyle than news. At news-heavy USA Today Network, AMP is generating 12 percent of all mobile page views, said Michael Kuntz, svp of digital there.

AMP has become a bigger part of the mix at The Verge, representing 14 percent of its traffic in September, according to its editor, Nilay Patel. One multi-title publisher, which didn’t want to share its results publicly, said its AMP pages are loading 95 percent faster and bounce rate is more than 50 percent lower than regular mobile search pages, “which is insane,” a top exec there said.

Source: Publishers are pleasantly surprised by Google AMP traffic – Digiday

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Google Metrics Closes ‘Loop’ Across Search, TV, YouTube, In-Store 09/26/2016

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Google Metrics Closes ‘Loop’ Across Search, TV, YouTube, In-Store by Laurie Sullivan@lauriesullivan, Yesterday, 7:00 AM Recommend (5)Google will make several announcements Monday during Advertising Week related to measurements and metrics. While some aim to prove the lean-in influence of television and YouTube campaigns onsearch. Others focus on the impact of online ads to in-store visits and sales and remarketing across devices, apps and Web sites.

The features will roll out during the next fewmonths.

Advertisers rely on search advertising to increase brand awareness and drive conversions for television and YouTube video ads. On Monday, Google will announce the forthcoming releaseof Brand Lift metrics to measure TV campaigns showing how television ads increase searches on Google and YouTube.The tool measures the direct impact that YouTube ads have on consumerperception and behavior from the initial impression to the final conversion — metrics such as brand awareness, ad recall, and consideration.

Early tests show that YouTube generates almost twotimes the searches per impression that TV generates, Brad Bender, Google VP of display and video advertising, wrote in a blog post. When running Brand Lift on both a TV campaign and a YouTubecampaign, Google can report on the incremental searches for the brand, he wrote.

Source: Google Metrics Closes ‘Loop’ Across Search, TV, YouTube, In-Store 09/26/2016

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Bing Admits Google AMP Speeds Mobile Page App Load Times By 80%

Microsoft Bing has rolled out support for Google’s Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) in its search app to gain speed on page load times for mobile on devices running iOS and Android.

As the pages load, the Bing App detects in the background whether the news articles have corresponding AMP pages associated with them. Bing will give preference to downloading the AMP page from serversclosest to the end user, preferably via an AMP cache for a faster experience. When an AMP page isn’t detected by Bing’s technology the non-AMP page will serve up to the individual.

“AMP does not impact our ranking algorithms in any way,” Marcelo De Barros, group engineering manager in charge of the AMP integration at Bing, wrote in a blog post. “Users will be able to detect the articlesthat have corresponding AMP pages whenever they see the AMP icon in our iOS app.

“De Barros wrote that Bing began experimenting with AMP in the app last May. Since then the group notices thatAMP pages load 80% faster than non-AMP pages.

Google says during the fourth quarter in 2016 and the first quarter of 2017 it will work on providing offline and geo-variation support, and moreassistance on validation, conditional behaviors, and grouping, as well as providing greater interactivity support by introducing a mechanism to bind element behavior to user actions.

Source: Bing Admits

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Google AMP is about to become a much bigger deal, showing up in everybody’s mobile search results » Nieman Journalism Lab

Still debating whether to make your #content AMP-compliant? Google is giving you by far your biggest nudge yet, and this one goes well beyond publishers.

Google’s effort to speed up the mobile web (and defend against the Facebook Instant Article-ization of everything) has become a steady drip of new features and announcements over the past few months, but the gradual rollout — and the project’s looming potential — has left some publishers wanting. (Slate and The Atlantic, for instance, both of whom create AMP pages for the majority of their stories, found that AMP pages accounted for “four percent of their site visits or less,” Digiday reported earlier this summer.)

A boost is coming, however: Google is now planning to show AMP links everywhere in its mobile search results — that is to say, in a place that probably drives a lot of traffic to your site. Wherever there’s an AMP page, Google will display it in the result (with an accompanying AMP lightning bolt). The boost does not come with any changes to the search rankings, and there are no plans to add a specific AMP signal into the Google search algorithm, Richard Gingras, Google’s head of news and social products, said. (Though page speed, which AMP targets, is already a small signal.) Users can test out how AMP pages will be displayed in an “early preview” — type in some search terms to try it out here on a mobile device. Google is looking for feedback from developers and publishers, and publishers who haven’t formatted their pages for AMP can get a sense of what they’ll be missing out on.

Source: Google AMP is about to become a much bigger deal, showing up in everybody’s mobile search results » Nieman Journalism Lab

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Why an eye scan could soon unlock Samsung and Apple phones

Iris scanning may be coming to a smartphone near you as early as next month. Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7 phone—to be released August 2—will very likely include iris recognition technology to unlock your phone. Apple may also roll out new iPhones with iris sensors in 2018, according to DigiTimes—delivering on user demand for biometric security checks over numeric passwords, but raising new practical and privacy concerns.

Iris scanning works by recognizing the flat, colored, ring-shaped membrane of the user’s eye. Like a fingerprint, each person’s iris is unique. While a retinal scan requires close proximity to an eyepiece, iris capture is more like taking a photograph.

“Smartphones have been improving camera quality, so it’s natural and easy to add the iris scan,” said Avivah Litan, an analyst at Gartner Research. “There is a lot of interest in iris scans and other biometrics among both consumers and employers, because the other security methods are being circumvented.”

Source: Why an eye scan could soon unlock Samsung and Apple phones – TechRepublic

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Google introduces speedier ads to its Accelerated Mobile Pages program – TechCrunch

Google has been working to create a faster news reading experience through its Accelerated Mobile Pages project. Now it’s bringing something similar to online ads.

AMP is an open framework for creating articles that load more quickly, particularly on mobile. (They also can be sped up by loading from Google’s cache.) At the time the program was announced, Google said it would allow publishers to run ads on their AMP-formatted articles, just like any other articles, and it’s already added support for more ad types.

Today, the company unveiled an AMP for Ads program, which allows marketers to create similarly optimized ads, presumably to run alongside those fast-loading articles. As Paul Muret, Google’s vice president of display, video and analytics put it in a blog post:

Source: Google introduces speedier ads to its Accelerated Mobile Pages program – TechCrunch

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Which browser is most popular on each major operating system? | ZDNet

Collectively, five browsers dominate the web, accounting for 98 percent of all traffic as measured by the latest U.S. Government Digital Analytics Program. (For a discussion of where that data comes from, see the note at the end of this earlier post.)

The trouble with those aggregate numbers is they mash together visits from sites running mobile and desktop operating systems, where the choice of browsers varies greatly. That’s why I was thrilled to see that the good folks at DAP released some new crosstab options this week.

Those new data formats now make it possible to measure browser usage in detail on individual platforms.

For this analysis, I used traffic from May 1, 2016 through June 17, 2016, breaking the results out across Android, iOS, Windows, and OS X. The results are eye-opening. Two overall conclusions are worth highlighting before diving into the details.

First, as open platforms, desktop operating systems have historically encouraged the development of alternative browsers and made it easy to switch. As a result, somewhere between 50 and 60 percent of all PC and Mac users choose a browser other than the default option. Among mobile operating systems, however, changing defaults is much more difficult (and nearly impossible on iOS). That explains the dominance of Google’s Chrome and Apple’s Safari.

Second, independent browsers are rapidly nearing extinction. A mere seven years ago, Mozilla’s Firefox was a force to be reckoned with. In 2016, its usage is approaching single-digit percentages, with Chrome now crushing it as the preferred non-default browser on desktop platforms. In addition, Firefox Mobile has had little or no success and is a statistical blip on mobile devices.

Source: Which browser is most popular on each major operating system? | ZDNet

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